The Worst Part Of Coronavirus Is Zombies


If you thought some of your dates were like 'zombies", now you might have to watch out for the real thing.

Man in coronavirus quarantine runs into street naked before biting woman to death

The 35-year-old man is reported to have started tearing his clothes off after a week of self-isolation before running into the street and launching his attack on a sleeping woman

A man who was forced to quarantine in his home over fears of coronavirus tore his clothes off and raced into the street naked before biting a sleeping elderly woman to death, it is claimed.

The man, named only as Manikandan, had flown home to India from Sri Lanka when he was ordered by authorities and his family not to leave his house for 14 days.

According to reports in India, after a week of the self-isolation the 35-year-old man began ripping his clothes off before he hurtled into the street in Tamil Nadu.

It is claimed he then began running through the adjacent streets where he spotted an elderly woman sleeping outside her own home.

Yahoo! News India says the man then raced up to her before clamping down on he neck and biting hard.

The 80-year-old lady couldn't be saved after she was attacked

The woman woke up and screamed, sending her nude attacker fleeing - but not before a mob had been gathered in a bid to track him down.

Frantic relatives raced the woman to hospital last Friday, but tragically she deteriorated while receiving medical care and died.

The attacker was eventually caught by the enraged mob who handed him over to police.


The roads are deserted as India is in lockdown amid the Covid-19 world crisis (File photo)

"On Friday, he disrobed himself and ran from his home. He tripped and fell a hundred metres from his home and targeted the elderly woman, who was sitting outside her house.

"According to the man's family, ever since Manikandan returned from Sri Lanka, he was stressed about losses his business suffered there and his mental health deteriorated."

A murder case has been filed against Manikandan.

Meanwhile, India's Prime Minster Narendra Modi has placed the country on lockdown with strict order to punish anyone who does not isolate.

By Keith Griffith For Dailymail.com


Scientists around the world are tracking at least eight strains of coronavirus around the world, using genetic detective work to show how the virus spreads.

Researchers say the virus appears to mutate very slowly, with only tiny differences between the different strains, and that none of the strains of the virus is more deadly than another. 

They also say it does not appear the strains will grow more lethal as they evolve.

'The virus mutates so slowly that the virus strains are fundamentally very similar to each other,' Charles Chiu, a professor of medicine and infectious disease at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, told USA Today

A map based on genome sequences shows have different strains of coronavirus have spread around the world, with at least eight strains being tracked

A map based on genome sequences shows have different strains of coronavirus have spread around the world, with at least eight strains being tracked

However, scientists around the world have been able to compile their genetic sequencing data at NextStrain.org, generating a map that tracks how the deadly virus has raced around the world. 

Tracking the different strains of SARS-CoV-2, as the virus is officially named, allows scientists to see whether containment measures are working, by showing whether new cases are from community spread, or imported from a different hotspot.

Chiu said his analysis shows California's strict 'stay at home' efforts appear to be working. 

He said that only 20 percent of the genomes he has sequenced in the past two weeks appear to come from community spread in California. The rest are associated with travel out of state, or tied to healthcare workers or family members of known cases.

Researchers stress that the different strains are fundamentally similar, because coronavirus mutates very slowly, about eight to 10 times slower than the common flu.

So far even in the virus's most divergent strains scientists have found only 11 base pair changes, out of a genome of 30,000 base pairs.

A 'family tree' of SARS-CoV-2 shows how different mutations have developed

A 'family tree' of SARS-CoV-2 shows how different mutations have developed

That means the different strains are not causing different symptoms, or inflicting different rates of fatality. 

Although different countries around the world have recorded significantly different fatality rates, this is almost certainly because they are testing their populations at different rates. 

Because many cases have no symptoms, aggressive and widespread testing makes the fatality rate appear to drop, because the total number of confirmed cases is much higher.

Researchers also say that when patients show no symptoms, or mild symptoms, it is not because they have contracted a 'mild strain' of the virus.

Rather, differences in symptoms most likely have more to do with an individual's own immune system and general health. A strain that has little effect on one person could be deadly to another.

'The current virus strains are still fundamentally very similar to each other,' Chiu said. 

This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health shows SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health shows SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

The slow mutation rate of the virus has given scientists hope that an eventual vaccine could provide protection for years, or even decades. 

Depending on how quickly a virus mutates, some vaccines have to be regularly updated, such a flu vaccines that have to be administered every year.

Other vaccines, such as for measles and chickenpox, provide protection for decades, or even a lifetime.

On Monday, Peter Thielen, a biologist with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, said that it appears coronavirus mutates slowly, more like measles and chickenpox than the flu.

'When this virus was first sequenced in China, that information was helpful in starting the process to develop a vaccine,' Thielen explained in a statement. 

Peter Thielen (front), a biologist with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, said that it appears coronavirus mutates slowly, more like measles and chickenpox than the flu

Peter Thielen (front), a biologist with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, said that it appears coronavirus mutates slowly, more like measles and chickenpox than the flu

'What we're doing informs whether or not the virus is mutating away from that original sequence, and how quickly,' he continued, describing his experiments to sequence the genome of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

'Based on the mutation rate, early data indicates that this would likely be a single vaccine rather than one that needs to be updated each year, like the flu shot,' he said. 

Experts say that the earliest a vaccine for coronavirus will be ready will be about a year BUT, this generation is the most well-prepared for Zombies thanks to The Walking Dead and World War Z, so we all what to do if they show up.